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JASA Calendar of Lectures and Special Events Print E-mail

Fall 2017


AUGUST • SEPTEMBER • OCTOBER • NOVEMBER • DECEMBER

Japanese textile


Please print out this schedule of Japanese Art Society events for reference. (Click on Print icon at right and use the print function of your browser.) You may also refer to the Newsletter's listing of JASA events. If you wish to receive reminders by E mail, please contact our Membership Coordinator. Lectures are open to the public and free of charge. Please note: The New York University Institute of Fine Arts requests that all members who plan to attend its events contact its hotline at (212) 992-5803 or E-mail IFA.Events@nyu.edu.  Please note: For events at the Marymount School, the building is landmarked and not wheelchair accessible. For all regional events, we would appreciate advance notice of attendance. Please contact the Membership Coordinator.


August

FRIDAY–Sunday, August 11–12

San Diego and Los Angeles
California
 

JASA Excursion to Southern California

JASA is hosting a special excursion for members to see a diverse array of Japanese art currently on exhibition. The program begins on Friday, August 11, in San Diego for a full day of activities in Balboa Park. We will start at the Mingei International Museum, which is exhibiting a fascinating selection of “Kanban,” traditional Japanese shop signs, which have been gathered from museums across the United States and Japan, as well as from the Mingei’s extensive collection. Chief Curator Christine Knoke will take us through the exhibition. 

In the afternoon, we will visit the San Diego Museum of Art, where Associate Curator for Asian Art Diana Chau will take us through a small but interesting print show, Modern Japan: Prints from the Taisho Era (1912–1926) and Beyond, as well as the permanent collection of Japanese and Asian art. We’ll also see some special objects from storage, including a rare Edo-period handscroll.

On Saturday, August 12, we will travel to Los Angeles to see the magnificent collection of Japanese cloisonné objects donated by Donald Gerber and Sueann Sherry to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art  and currently on exhibition at the Pavilion for Japanese Art. Mr. Gerber will personally lead us through the exhibition and talk about his experience collecting some of the finest examples of cloisonné art in the world. Afterward, you are free to visit Japanese Painting: A Walk in Nature, which is also on display in the Pavilion.

The trip is limited to 15 people. There is no program charge; however, participants are responsible for transportation and lodging. Hotel recommendations (in San Diego) will be provided on request. Participants are responsible for museum admissions. Cost for the catered dinner on Saturday will be determined. We should have enough cars to transport participants from San Diego to Los Angeles on August 12, but if we need to rent a small bus, that cost will be determined. We recommend out-of-towners fly into San Diego and leave from Los Angeles.

Registration is first come first served. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: 8/11- 8/12 2017 Southern California Visitthen click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


September

Monday, September 11, 10 a.m.

Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Ave.
New York, NY 10028

MET EXHIBITION TOUR OF JAPANESE BAMBOO ART: The Abbey Collection

We are pleased to invite members to join a second tour of the Japanese Bamboo Art: The Abbey Collection exhibition with Monika Bincsik, Assistant Curator. The exhibit will be on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from June 13, 2017 through Feb 4, 2018.

This popular exhibition, which was recently reviewed in The New York Times, features more than 80 works of Japanese bamboo art, dating from the late 19th century to the present, the period when basketry in Japan became recognized as an art form that transcends “craft.”  The exhibition, including works by all six masters who have received the designation “Living National Treasure,” is drawn from the Abbey Collection, one of the finest private collections of Japanese baskets and bamboo sculpture.

Monika Bincsik, Assistant Curator in The Metropolitan Museum‘s Department of Asian Art, is one of the field‘s bright young stars, specializing in Japanese decorative arts and textiles. Previously, she served as Curator of Japanese Art at the Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest from 2002 to 2007 and as research assistant at the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, where she earned a second Ph.D. for a dissertation focusing on Japanese lacquers.

Reservations are required. Space is limited to 25. Tour fee: $10.  Registration is first come first served. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 9/11/17 Met Bamboo Tour, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


Monday, September 11, 5 p.m.

Scholten Japanese Art
145 West 58th St., Suite 6D
New York, NY 10019

Darkening Skies: The Tumultuous Times of Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Katherine Martin will host a special private viewing of the Scholten Japanese Art Gallery's exhibition of prints by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839–1892). There will be a gallery talk for JASA members on Monday, September 11 from 5-7 p.m. (with refreshments served after the talk). The gallery exhibition will display approximately 40 prints and will be on view from Thursday, September 7th through Friday, September 15th. The exhibition is a continuation of the gallery's March 2017 single-artist exhibition on Yoshitoshi, one of the last great ukiyo-e artists of the 19th century. Drawing from a collection assembled over a period of nearly ten years (and recently published in a full-color catalogue illustrating 180 woodblock prints), the September show will focus on the dynamic and tumultuous times in which Yoshitoshi lived as reflected in some of his more violent imagery.

Reservations are required. Space is limited to 15 members. The deadline to sign up is Tuesday, September 5.
Registration is first come first served. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 9/11/17 Scholten Japanese Art Talk, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator, at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


Thursday, September 14, 5:30–7 p.m.

Ronin Gallery
425 Madison Ave., 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10017

PRIVATE RECEPTION AND ARTIST TALK WITH KATSUTOSHI YUASA

Ronin Gallery is pleased to invite the members of JASA and the New York Print Club to a private reception and artist talk.  Experience the works of some of Japan’s brightest talents in the second annual Contemporary Talents of Japan exhibition, featuring Katsutoshi Yuasa, the 2017 winner of the Ronin|Globus Artist-in-Residence Program. Katsutoshi Yuasa's striking woodblock prints present a conversation between the contemporaneity of photography and the tradition of woodblock printmaking. Also on exhibition will be selected masterpieces of Hiroshige.

Reservations are required. Space is limited to 25. Registration is first come first served. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 9/14/17 Ronin Gallery Talk, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator, at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


Tuesday, September 19, 6 p.m.

The Marymount School
1026 Fifth Ave., between 83rd and 84th Streets

New York, New York

Langdon Warner: Impassioned Advocate of Japanese Art and Culture

Patricia J. Graham, Ph.D., will give a talk on Langdon Warner (1881-1955), a long-time curator of Asian art at Harvard University's Fogg Art Museum and a World War II Monuments Man, who significantly helped shape and sustain the American public's understanding of East Asia and especially of Japan, from the 1920s through the early postwar period. His introduction to the field began at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts under the tutelage of Okakura Kakuzō. Described by fellow Monuments Man George Stout in 1946 as “a pistol,” Warner's visit to Japan warranted a full two-column laudatory editorial in the English language newspaper, Nippon Times. Warner is still fondly remembered in Japan as a savior of cultural treasures during World War II, and has been the subject of two recent Japanese documentaries on this subject. This talk is based on Pat Graham’s book-in-progress about Warner and Japan, and draws from numerous archival and published sources.

Dr. Graham is a former professor of Japanese art and culture, and former museum curator. She is currently an adjunct research associate at the University of Kansas Center for East Asian Studies and a consultant and certified Asian art appraiser based in Louisville, Colorado. Her interest in Langdon Warner began with her work at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, where she catalogued over 900 Japanese art objects that Warner assembled for the museum in the early 1930s. Her many publications include Tea of the Sages: The Art of Sencha (1998), Faith and Power in Japanese Buddhist Art, 1600–2005 (2007) and Japanese Design: Art, Aesthetics, and Culture (2014).

Reservations are required. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 9/19/17 Langdon Warner Lecture, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.

Please note: Marymount is a landmarked building and not wheelchair accessible.


October

Saturday, October 7

Minneapolis Institute of Art
2400 Third Ave. South
Minneapolis, MN 55404

TALKS ON Two Exhibitions of Contemporary Japanese Art

10:30 A.M. | Pillsbury Auditorium

The exhibit Hard Bodies: Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture—30 works by 16 artist drawn from the Clark Collections at Mia, the only collection to feature this extraordinary new form—comprise the first-ever exhibition of contemporary Japanese lacquer sculpture. Andreas Marks, Ph.D., Mary Griggs Burke Curator of Japanese and Korean Art, Japanese and Korean Art Department Head, and Director of the Clark Center at Mia, will present Contemporary Japanese Lacquer Sculpture: A Short History. Since the Neolithic era, artisans in East Asia have coated bowls, cups, boxes, baskets and other utilitarian objects with a natural polymer distilled from the sap of the rhus verniciflua, known as the lacquer tree. In recent decades, a small but enterprising circle of lacquer artists have pushed the medium in entirely new directions by creating large-scale sculptures that superbly exploit lacquer’s lustrous beauty. Thirty works by 16 artists—drawn from the Clark Collections at Mia, the only collection to feature this extraordinary new form—comprise the first-ever exhibition of contemporary Japanese lacquer sculpture.

Noon | Villa Rosa Room

Seated luncheon.

1:30 PM | Pillsbury Auditorium

In the Lotus Pond: The Life and Art of Minol Araki will be presented by Aaron Rio, Ph.D., Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Curator of Japanese and Korean Art, in conjunction with the exhibit Boundless Peaks: Ink Paintings by Minol Araki, Renowned as an industrial designer, Minol Araki (1928–2010) was also a prolific painter. Born in China to Japanese parents, and active professionally in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Taipei and New York, Araki created an immense body of ink paintings that reimagined tradition and straddled East and West. This exhibition is organized around five large-scale paintings depicting landscapes, dragons, snow monkeys and a lotus pond, complemented by works evincing such disparate influences as the Chinese painter Bada Shanren (c. 1626–1705), Lithuanian-American artist Ben Shahn (1898–1969), Araki‘s mentor Zhang Daqian (1899–1983) and medieval Japanese Zen painters. 


Wednesday, October 11, 9:25 a.m.

Japanese Garden at Kykuit
200 Lake Road
Pocantico Hills
, NY

GARDEN TOUR AND TEA CEREMONY

On this full-day excursion with Curator and JASA Board Member Cynthia Altman, JASA members will tour the teahouse designed by Yoshimura Junzo and take part in a tea ceremony. Urasenke Tea Master Yoshihiro Terazono will join us once again to demonstrate the details of this ancient tradition. JASA member Tomoko Urabe and Greg Succop will participate as tea-ceremony assistants. This will be  followed by a bento lunch (included in the tour fee).

Reservations are required. Space is limited to 14 members. Tour fee: $45 per person. Train fare is additional. Registration is first come first served. Priority will be given to those who have not participated in JASA's trips to Kykuit in the past. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 10/11/17 Japanese Tea Garden Tour, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator, at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.

Please note: The paths are irregular stepping stones and the two acre garden can be difficult to navigate; the step to enter the teahouse is quite high. If it rains, we will postpone to another date.


November

Wednesday, November 8, 6 p.m.

The Marymount School
1026 Fifth Ave., between 83rd and 84th Streets

New York, New York

Ogata Kōrin and His Turn to Art

Frank Feltens, Ph.D., gives this talk on Ogata Kōrin (1658–1716), one of Japan's most cherished early modern artists. As was the case with many artists before and after him, history has turned Kōrin into a larger-than-life figure, a fact that has shrouded our understanding of the actual person behind his genius facade. Yet we are fortunate that Kōrin's descendants preserved an unparalleled amount of documentation on Kōrin and his life. The wealth of letters and other records that survive allows us to uncover a very private side of the artist, one that unveils how illicit love affairs and inconsiderate spending gave rise to one of Japan's greatest artists.

Dr. Feltens is Anne van Biema Fellow at the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. He received his PhD in Japanese art history from Columbia University in 2016. His research focuses on late medieval and early modern Japanese painting. Recent publications include Shinshutsu Sensōji zō Sakai Hōitsu shita-e Namu Butsuan honzon tenjiku butsuzōki ni tsuite” [”A Newly Discovered Handscroll at Sensōji with Underpaintings by Sakai Hōitsu”], Kokka 1440 (October 2015) and “Traversing Time: Three Centuries of Japanese Art at the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin,” Orientations 46, No. 7 (October 2015). His article “Sartorial Identity: Early Modern Japanese Textile Patterns and the Afterlife of Ogata Kōrin” will appear in Ars Orientalis in October 2017. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the life and art of Ogata Kōrin.

Reservations are required. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 11/8/17 Ogata Kōrin Lecture, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.

Please note: Marymount is a landmarked building and not wheelchair accessible.


November 17–19

New Orleans, Louisiana

Three-day Visit to New Orleans

Join us for an autumn visit to the gracious city of New Orleans to see the special exhibition, New Forms, New Voices: Japanese Ceramics from the Gitter-Yelen Collection, at the New Orleans Museum of Art. There will be a reception and special lecture, Japanese Ceramics Tomorrow, by noted scholar Joe Earle on the evening of November 17. A private visit to the Gitter-Yelen Collection at the Gitters’ New Orleans home is planned. A complete itinerary to be sent next month.

Using examples from the Kurt and Alice Gitter collection as well as others by emerging artists, all of them made during the current century, Earle will show how contemporary Japanese ceramics have reached an interesting point of development. As the time-worn narratives of “innovation within tradition” and “Japaneseness versus Westernness” recede into insignificance, it becomes easier for us to look at these works from a more global perspective.

Joe Earle was Director of Japan Society Gallery in New York from 2007 to 2012 and previously held leadership positions in Asian art departments at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Now based in London, he works as Senior Consultant for Bonhams auction house in the U.K. and U.S. He has also revived his former career as a prolific author of Japanese art catalogues, with no fewer than six titles due to be published this year.

Reservations for this trip are required. Space is limited to 15. Those interested in attending should reserve by October 1.  Trip fee: $200. The price includes four specially planned meals. This does not include airfare, hotel, or local transportation.

For further details--including a preliminary itinerary as well as hotel information--or to reserve your spot, please click on this link: JASA 11/17/17 New Orleans Trip. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator, at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


December

Monday, December 11,  6 p.m

The Marymount School
1026 Fifth Avenue, between 83rd and 84th Streets

New York, New York

JASA Holiday Party and Special Guest Lecture

Professor Samuel L. Leiter will speak on Kabuki at the Turning Point: 1952–1965. During the post-Occupation years of 1952–1965, kabuki’s future was in limbo. Tokyo’s three major kabuki theaters had been rebuilt, including the Kabuki-za, but the future remained uncertain in a rapidly changing postwar society, with competition from multiple forms of entertainment. Its senior actors were passing away, its company system was crumbling, promising actors were deserting to act in movies, its major producer was being raided by a rival, new plays were becoming rare, and the fate of men playing females was in doubt. At the same time, international tours were begun and an enormously popular star took kabuki's most revered name. This talk describes the challenges kabuki faced before regaining its footing as Japan’s best-known theatrical form.

Professor Leiter is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Theater at Brooklyn College, CUNY, and the Graduate Center, CUNY. He was a Fulbright research scholar to Japan and has received many other academic honors and awards, including being the first theater scholar to receive an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Emeritus Fellowship. In 2017 he received Brooklyn College’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He was editor-in-chief of Asian Theatre Journal from 1992 to 2004 and has written or edited over two dozen books on Japanese theater, New York theater, famous stage directors and Shakespeare. His articles have appeared in numerous professional journals, and he has published essays in 18 books. His experiences also include having done the back-translations of three Broadway musicals for their Tokyo productions. From 2012 to 2014 he served as a nominator for New York’s Drama Desk Awards and is currently a Drama Desk voter. Over the past five years, he has reviewed over 1,000 New York shows on the blogs Theatre's Leiter Side, Theater Pizzazz and the Broadway Blog.

Reservations are required. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link: JASA 12/11/17 Holiday Party, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.

Please note: Marymount is a landmarked building and not wheelchair accessible.


Friday, December 15, 4 p.m.

Japan Society
333 East 47th St.
New York, NY

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Gates of Paradise Exhibition Tour 

A guided tour by Dr. Michael Chagnon, Curator of Exhibition Interpretation, of the special exhibition, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Gates of Paradise, an exploration of cross-cultural interactions between Japan and the West in the 16th century (referring to the famous Tensho Embassy of 1582–90), including Important Cultural Properties from Japan and the world premiere of Sugimoto's ”Gates of Paradise” series, on view in two rotations at Japan Society from October 20, 2017 to January 7, 2018.

Reservations are required.  Space is limited to 25. Fee: $ 10. If you would like to attend, please register by clicking this link:JASA 12/17/17 Michael Chagnon, then click the Register Now button and fill out the registration form. If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


Friday, December 15, 5:30 p.m.

Japan Society
333 East 47th St.
New York, NY

An Evening with Hiroshi Sugimoto

Artist Hiroshi Sugimoto will share his perspective on the exhibition, which explores an early, though largely forgotten, encounter between Japan and the West in the 16th century. The artist’s latest series, focusing on the Ghiberti Gates in Florence is a special highlight. Hiroshi Sugimoto will also introduce his latest architectural and theater projects.

Fee: $15 ($12 for Japan Society and students only). Tickets may be purchased directly from the box office at the Japan Society.  If you have any questions, please contact Cheryl Gall, Membership Coordinator,  at jasa@japaneseartsoc.org or (781) 862-8558.


Past JASA programs

January–June 2017
January–December 2016
January–December 2015
January–December 2014
January–December 2013
January–December 2012
January–December 2011
January–December 2010
January–December 2009
January–December 2008
January–December 2007
January–December 2006
January–December 2005
September–December 2004